Tagged: books

Ten Great Books About Women’s Health

I'm committed. So don't spoilt the ending.

I’m committed. So don’t spoil the ending.

I don’t read too much non-fiction these days. Right now I’m speed reading  Gone Girl . It’s kinda sorta okay but makes me feel like my brain is melting. I don’t really like Gone Girl, but I can’t stop reading it. It’s kind of like my sugar addiction.

On my shelf waiting to be read I have Swamplandia and The Time Traveller’s Wife. This month my reading list fits  my demographic profile way too neatly. Amazon could peg me perfectly.

To my credit, the last time I went to the library, I checked out Far From the Tree, Buddhism for Mothers and  In the House of the Interpreter. But I haven’t read them yet. This summer I read everything Jamaica Kincaid ever wrote (except this one) . She is so perfect. But I also read The Happiness Project.  Please don’t let me read Jodi Picoult. If I read Jodi Picoult, it’s all over.

Anyhoo, back when I was a full-time smarty pants, I spent countless hours reading nonfiction, I read about health. Particularly women’s health. There is so much out there, and I feel lucky to have been introduced to it. So in case you’re looking for something to read that’s not a white lady novel, here  we go.

Ten great books about  women’s health:

1. Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction and the Meaning of Liberty. Dorothy Roberts is a great writer. This book will help you understand the racist undertones of much of American political discourse about reproductive health and entitlement programs.

2. How the Pro-Choice Movement Saved America: Freedom, Politics and the War on Sex. Cristina Page. Best title ever

3. Cunt. Speaking of titles… okay, it’s a little crass and the language is tiny bit outdated, but Inga Muscio’s take menstruation, reproductive health and sexual freedom is still empowering

4. A Darker Ribbon. One of the most well-researched critiques of the breast cancer movement that is not preach or overly academic.

5. Reproductive Rights and Wrongs: The Global Politics of Population Control. This should be required reading for anyone working for — or wanting to work for —  an international development organization.

6. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down : A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors and a Collision of Two Cultures. A can’t-put-it-down kind of read written by a journalist.

7. Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis on America.  An ethnography of genetic counseling. A little bit on the jargony side, but still a good read.

8.   Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor.Paul Farmer will make you want to try and save the world.

9. Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety. You are what you eat. Marion Nestle.

10. How to Have Theory in an Epidemic: Cultural Chronicles of AIDS. Would get the award for best title if I hadn’t already given it to Cristina Page. Paula Treichler is one of my favorite smarty-pants writers.

And one bonus book…

11. Birth as an American Rite of Passage. Robbie Davis-Floyd. A classic. Read it.

What about you? What are your favorite women’s health books? What did I forget?  And hey, what are you reading? I’ll forgive you if it’s Jodi Picoult.